Not only is gender a cultural creation but that our bodies are also interpretable thanks to a series of standards that we build as a society. Currently, these norms are determined by the medical language. Social classification based on sex is an election, which defines the woman as the other body, charged with social and political dictums. She is determined by external agreements that decide on her fragments.

The body as a frontier. It is bi-directionally related to the socio-cultural environment, constituted for and by it.  

But, what would it be like if we perceived our body beyond our individuality? If the land was an extension of us? What would it be if my feet were not my limits but the rocks I'm standing on? If my sewing needles were an extension of my hands?

In transforming how we perceive the land there is a dissolution of our individuality and the deconstruction of the cultural elements that limit our body. The destruction of gender structure comes with tearing down the cultural constructions that define the bodies from the moment of birth.

In this piece, I see South America reflected in a mirror, and in its reflection, the land becomes a body. The black bodies merged with the territory, erasing the frontier. Two feminine figures support and become the continent. Individuality is dissolved to show a plurality and to break the binary system that rules on our corporality.